Extra virgin olive oil is one of the most representative ingredients of the Mediterranean Diet. On home-made bread bruschetta, with fish and grilled vegetables, legume soups or salads, is that extra touch that, when served raw, gives flavour and aroma to every dish.

Behind that drizzle of oil poured to flavour food with such natural gesture, there is a long process beginning in late autumn when the olives are harvested.

The harvest is done with equipment that preserves all the goodness of each olive. The transition from the field to the crusher takes place on the same day because the product must be processed fresh. The oil is cold pressed to preserve its nutritional properties. This is all that is behind that drizzle of oil always present on Italian tables.

To be defined as “extra virgin olive oil“, the oil must comply with very specific parameters, including acidity, which must not exceed 0.8%. When eaten without exaggeration and added raw to food as part of a healthy diet, it can contribute to significant health benefits: it helps prevent cardiovascular problems and can help keep under control bad cholesterol values. It is also rich in antioxidants that help combat cellular ageing and, last but not least, helps the digestive system.

 

Source

Veronesi Foundation